Review of: Wild West

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Wild West

Leitung, Betreuung & Organisation, Miete des Durchführungsortes, Wild-West-​Spiele inkl. Bogenschiessen, Siegerehrung und Siegerpreise, Getränke-Apéro. alle Geschäfte; Freizeit; Gastronomie; Geschenke; Geschenkkarte; Gesundheit/​Arzt; Haushalt; Kinderparadies; Kino; Kosmetik; Lebensmittel; Medien/. Untergenres des Wildwestfilms, die nicht immer im Wortsinn mit dem Wilden Westen zusammenhängen, sind: der Kavalleriewestern (z. B. Bis zum letzten Mann.

Wild-West-Atmosphäre im Berner Jura

Wild Wild West ist eine US-amerikanische Steampunk-Western-Action-Komödie, die unter der Regie von Barry Sonnenfeld entstand. Der Film startete am. Untergenres des Wildwestfilms, die nicht immer im Wortsinn mit dem Wilden Westen zusammenhängen, sind: der Kavalleriewestern (z. B. Bis zum letzten Mann. Wild-West-Atmosphäre im Berner Jura. Bison Ranch. © Letizia Paladino - www.​themerrythoughts.com

Wild West Sezony i odcinki Video

Nerf Wild West

California entered the Union in as a free state; the other areas remained territories for many years. The new state grew rapidly as migrants poured into the fertile cotton lands of east Texas.

The central area of the state was developed more by subsistence farmers who seldom owned slaves. Texas in its Wild West days attracted men who could shoot straight and possessed the zest for adventure, "for masculine renown, patriotic service, martial glory, and meaningful deaths".

In about 10, Californios Hispanics lived in California, primarily on cattle ranches in what is now the Los Angeles area. A few hundred foreigners were scattered in the northern districts, including some Americans.

With the outbreak of war with Mexico in the U. Army unit, as well as naval forces, and quickly took control. Thousands of "Forty-Niners" reached California, by sailing around South America or taking a short-cut through disease-ridden Panama , or walked the California trail.

The population soared to over , in , mostly in the gold districts that stretched into the mountains east of San Francisco.

Housing in San Francisco was at a premium, and abandoned ships whose crews had headed for the mines were often converted to temporary lodging.

In the goldfields themselves, living conditions were primitive, though the mild climate proved attractive. Supplies were expensive and food poor, typical diets consisting mostly of pork, beans, and whiskey.

These highly male, transient communities with no established institutions were prone to high levels of violence, drunkenness, profanity, and greed-driven behavior.

Without courts or law officers in the mining communities to enforce claims and justice, miners developed their ad hoc legal system, based on the "mining codes" used in other mining communities abroad.

Each camp had its own rules and often handed out justice by popular vote, sometimes acting fairly and at times exercising vigilantes; with Indians, Mexicans, and Chinese generally receiving the harshest sentences.

The gold rush radically changed the California economy and brought in an array of professionals, including precious metal specialists, merchants, doctors, and attorneys, who added to the population of miners, saloon keepers, gamblers, and prostitutes.

A San Francisco newspaper stated, "The whole country Violent bandits often preyed upon the miners, such as the case of Jonathan R. Davis ' killing of eleven bandits single-handedly.

In a few years, nearly all of the independent miners were displaced as mines were purchased and run by mining companies, who then hired low-paid salaried miners.

As gold became harder to find and more difficult to extract, individual prospectors gave way to paid work gangs, specialized skills, and mining machinery.

Bigger mines, however, caused greater environmental damage. In the mountains, shaft mining predominated, producing large amounts of waste. Beginning in , at the end of the '49 gold rush, through , hydraulic mining was used.

Despite huge profits being made, it fell into the hands of a few capitalists, displaced numerous miners, vast amounts of waste entered river systems, and did heavy ecological damage to the environment.

Hydraulic mining ended when the public outcry over the destruction of farmlands led to the outlawing of this practice.

The mountainous areas of the triangle from New Mexico to California to South Dakota contained hundreds of hard rock mining sites, where prospectors discovered gold, silver, copper and other minerals as well as some soft-rock coal.

Temporary mining camps sprang up overnight; most became ghost towns when the ores were depleted. Prospectors spread out and hunted for gold and silver along the Rockies and in the southwest.

Soon gold was discovered in Colorado , Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Idaho, Montana, and South Dakota by The discovery of the Comstock Lode , containing vast amounts of silver, resulted in the Nevada boomtowns of Virginia City , Carson City , and Silver City.

The wealth from silver, more than from gold, fueled the maturation of San Francisco in the s and helped the rise of some of its wealthiest families, such as that of George Hearst.

They moved in large groups under an experienced wagonmaster, bringing their clothing, farm supplies, weapons, and animals.

These wagon trains followed major rivers, crossed prairies and mountains, and typically ended in Oregon and California. Pioneers generally attempted to complete the journey during a single warm season, usually for six months.

By , when the first migrant wagon train was organized in Independence, Missouri , a wagon trail had been cleared to Fort Hall, Idaho.

Trails were cleared further and further west, eventually reaching the Willamette Valley in Oregon. This network of wagon trails leading to the Pacific Northwest was later called the Oregon Trail.

The eastern half of the route was also used by travelers on the California Trail from , Mormon Trail from , and Bozeman Trail from before they turned off to their separate destinations.

In the "Wagon Train of ", some to 1, emigrants headed for Oregon; missionary Marcus Whitman led the wagons on the last leg. Some did so because they were discouraged and defeated.

Some returned with bags of gold and silver. Most were returning to pick up their families and move them all back west. These "gobacks" were a major source of information and excitement about the wonders and promises—and dangers and disappointments—of the far West.

Not all emigrants made it to their destination. The dangers of the overland route were numerous: snakebites, wagon accidents, violence from other travelers, suicide, malnutrition, stampedes, Indian attacks, a variety of diseases dysentery , typhoid , and cholera were among the most common , exposure, avalanches, etc.

One particularly well-known example of the treacherous nature of the journey is the story of the ill-fated Donner Party , which became trapped in the Sierra Nevada mountains during the winter of — in which nearly half of the 90 people traveling with the group died from starvation and exposure, and some resorted to cannibalism to survive.

There were also frequent attacks from bandits and highwaymen , such as the infamous Harpe brothers who patrolled the frontier routes and targeted migrant groups.

In Missouri and Illinois, animosity between the Mormon settlers and locals grew, which would mirror those in other states such as Utah years later.

Violence finally erupted on October 24, , when militias from both sides clashed and a mass killing of Mormons in Livingston County occurred 6 days later.

A hundred rural Mormon settlements sprang up in what Young called " Deseret ", which he ruled as a theocracy. It later became Utah Territory.

Young's Salt Lake City settlement served as the hub of their network, which reached into neighboring territories as well.

The communalism and advanced farming practices of the Mormons enabled them to succeed. Following the end of the Mexican-American War in , Utah was ceded to the United States by Mexico.

Though the Mormons in Utah had supported U. Founded in , the Republican Party was openly hostile towards The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints LDS Church in Utah over the practice of polygamy, viewed by most of the American public as an affront to religious, cultural, and moral values of modern civilization.

Confrontations verged on open warfare in the late s as President Buchanan sent in troops. Although there were no military battles fought, and negotiations led to a stand down, violence still escalated and there were several casualties.

During this time, Congress refused to admit Utah into the Union as a state and statehood would mean an end to direct federal control over the territory and the possible ascension of politicians chosen and controlled by the LDS Church into most if not all federal, state and local elected offices from the new state.

Finally, in , the church leadership announced polygamy was no longer a central tenet, thereafter a compromise. In , Utah was admitted as the 45th state with the Mormons dividing between Republicans and Democrats.

The federal government provided subsidies for the development of mail and freight delivery, and by , Congress authorized road improvements and an overland mail service to California.

The new commercial wagon trains service primarily hauled freight. In John Butterfield —69 established a stage service that went from Saint Louis to San Francisco in 24 days along a southern route.

William Russell, hoping to get a government contract for more rapid mail delivery service, started the Pony Express in , cutting delivery time to ten days.

In Congress passed the Land-Grant Telegraph Act which financed the construction of Western Union's transcontinental telegraph lines. Hiram Sibley , Western Union's head, negotiated exclusive agreements with railroads to run telegraph lines along their right-of-way.

Eight years before the transcontinental railroad opened, the First Transcontinental Telegraph linked Omaha, Nebraska, to San Francisco on October 24, Constitutionally, Congress could not deal with slavery in the states but it did have jurisdiction in the western territories.

California unanimously rejected slavery in and became a free state. New Mexico allowed slavery, but it was rarely seen there. Kansas was off-limits to slavery by the Compromise of Free Soil elements feared that if slavery were allowed rich planters would buy up the best lands and work them with gangs of slaves, leaving little opportunity for free white men to own farms.

Few Southern planters were interested in Kansas, but the idea that slavery was illegal there implied they had a second-class status that was intolerable to their sense of honor, and seemed to violate the principle of state's rights.

With the passage of the extremely controversial Kansas—Nebraska Act in , Congress left the decision up to the voters on the ground in Kansas.

Across the North, a new major party was formed to fight slavery: the Republican Party , with numerous westerners in leadership positions, most notably Abraham Lincoln of Illinois.

To influence the territorial decision, anti-slavery elements also called "Jayhawkers" or "Free-soilers" financed the migration of politically determined settlers.

But pro-slavery advocates fought back with pro-slavery settlers from Missouri. The antislavery forces took over by , as Kansas became a free state.

The episode demonstrated that a democratic compromise between North and South over slavery was impossible and served to hasten the Civil War. Despite its large territory, the trans-Mississippi West had a small population and its wartime story has to a large extent been underplayed in the historiography of the American Civil War.

The Confederacy engaged in several important campaigns in the West. However, Kansas, a major area of conflict building up to the war, was the scene of only one battle, at Mine Creek.

But its proximity to Confederate lines enabled pro-Confederate guerrillas, such as Quantrill's Raiders , to attack Union strongholds and massacre the residents.

In Texas, citizens voted to join the Confederacy; anti-war Germans were hanged. Confederate Arizona was created by Arizona citizens who wanted protection against Apache raids after the United States Army units were moved out.

The Confederacy then sets its sight to gain control of the New Mexico Territory. General Henry Hopkins Sibley was tasked for the campaign, and together with his New Mexico Army , marched right up the Rio Grande in an attempt to take the mineral wealth of Colorado as well as California.

The First Regiment of Volunteers discovered the rebels, and they immediately warned and joined the Yankees at Fort Union. The Battle of Glorieta Pass soon erupted, and the Union ended the Confederate campaign and the area west of Texas remained in Union hands.

Missouri , a Union state where slavery was legal, became a battleground when the pro-secession governor, against the vote of the legislature, led troops to the federal arsenal at St.

Louis ; he was aided by Confederate forces from Arkansas and Louisiana. However, Union General Samuel Curtis regained St. Louis and all of Missouri for the Union.

The state was the scene of numerous raids and guerrilla warfare in the west. Army after established a series of military posts across the frontier, designed to stop warfare among Indian tribes or between Indians and settlers.

Throughout the 19th century, Army officers typically served built their careers in peacekeeper roles moving from fort to fort until retirement.

Actual combat experience was uncommon for any one soldier. The most dramatic conflict was the Sioux war in Minnesota in when Dakota tribes systematically attacked German farms to drive out the settlers.

For several days, Dakota attacks at the Lower Sioux Agency , New Ulm and Hutchinson , slaughtered to white settlers.

The state militia fought back and Lincoln sent in federal troops. The ensuing battles at Fort Ridgely , Birch Coulee , Fort Abercrombie , and Wood Lake punctuated a six-week war, which ended in an American victory.

The federal government tried Indians for murder, and were convicted and sentenced to death. Lincoln pardoned the majority, but 38 leaders were hanged.

The decreased presence of Union troops in the West left behind untrained militias; hostile tribes used the opportunity to attack settlers. The militia struck back hard, most notably by attacking the winter quarters of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians, filled with women and children, at the Sand Creek massacre in eastern Colorado in late Kit Carson and the U.

Army in trapped the entire Navajo tribe in New Mexico, where they had been raiding settlers and put them on a reservation. In , Congress enacted two major laws to facilitate settlement of the West: the Homestead Act and the Pacific Railroad Act.

The result by was millions of new farms in the Plains states, many operated by new immigrants from Germany and Scandinavia. With the war over and slavery abolished, the federal government focused on improving the governance of the territories.

It subdivided several territories, preparing them for statehood, following the precedents set by the Northwest Ordinance of It standardized procedures and the supervision of territorial governments, taking away some local powers, and imposing much "red tape", growing the federal bureaucracy significantly.

Federal involvement in the territories was considerable. In addition to direct subsidies, the federal government maintained military posts, provided safety from Indian attacks, bankrolled treaty obligations, conducted surveys and land sales, built roads, staffed land offices, made harbor improvements, and subsidized overland mail delivery.

Territorial citizens came to both decry federal power and local corruption, and at the same time, lament that more federal dollars were not sent their way.

Territorial governors were political appointees and beholden to Washington so they usually governed with a light hand, allowing the legislatures to deal with the local issues.

In addition to his role as civil governor, a territorial governor was also a militia commander, a local superintendent of Indian affairs, and the state liaison with federal agencies.

The legislatures, on the other hand, spoke for the local citizens and they were given considerable leeway by the federal government to make local law.

These improvements to governance still left plenty of room for profiteering. As Mark Twain wrote while working for his brother, the secretary of Nevada, "The government of my country snubs honest simplicity but fondles artistic villainy, and I think I might have developed into a very capable pickpocket if I had remained in the public service a year or two.

In acquiring, preparing, and distributing public land to private ownership, the federal government generally followed the system set forth by the Land Ordinance of Federal exploration and scientific teams would undertake reconnaissance of the land and determine Native American habitation.

Through treaties, the land titles would be ceded by the resident tribes. Townships would be formed from the lots and sold at public auction.

As part of public policy, the government would award public land to certain groups such as veterans, through the use of "land script".

As a counter to land speculators, farmers formed "claims clubs" to enable them to buy larger tracts than the acre 0.

In , Congress passed three important bills that transformed the land system. The Homestead Act granted acres 0.

The only cost was a modest filing fee. The law was especially important in the settling of the Plains states.

Many took a free homestead and others purchased their land from railroads at low rates. The Pacific Railroad Act of provided for the land needed to build the transcontinental railroad.

The land was given the railroads alternated with government-owned tracts saved for free distribution to homesteaders.

Railroads had up to five years to sell or mortgage their land, after tracks were laid, after which unsold land could be purchased by anyone.

Often railroads sold some of their government acquired land to homesteaders immediately to encourage settlement and the growth of markets the railroads would then be able to serve.

Nebraska railroads in the s were strong boosters of lands along their routes. They sent agents to Germany and Scandinavia with package deals that included cheap transportation for the family as well as its furniture and farm tools, and they offered long-term credit at low rates.

Boosterism succeeded in attracting adventurous American and European families to Nebraska , helping them purchase land grant parcels on good terms.

The selling price depended on such factors as soil quality, water, and distance from the railroad.

The Morrill Act of provided land grants to states to begin colleges of agriculture and mechanical arts engineering.

Black colleges became eligible for these land grants in The Act succeeded in its goals to open new universities and make farming more scientific and profitable.

In the s government-sponsored surveys to chart the remaining unexplored regions of the West, and to plan possible routes for a transcontinental railroad.

Much of this work was undertaken by the Corps of Engineers , Corps of Topographical Engineers , and Bureau of Explorations and Surveys, and became known as "The Great Reconnaissance".

Regionalism animated debates in Congress regarding the choice of a northern, central, or southern route. Engineering requirements for the rail route were an adequate supply of water and wood, and as nearly-level route as possible, given the weak locomotives of the era.

In the s, proposals to build a transcontinental failed because of Congressional disputes over slavery. With the secession of the Confederate states in , the modernizers in the Republican party took over Congress and wanted a line to link to California.

Private companies were to build and operate the line. Construction would be done by unskilled laborers who would live in temporary camps along the way.

Immigrants from China and Ireland did most of the construction work. Theodore Judah , the chief engineer of the Central Pacific surveyed the route from San Francisco east.

Judah's tireless lobbying efforts in Washington were largely responsible for the passage of the Pacific Railroad Act , which authorized construction of both the Central Pacific and the Union Pacific which built west from Omaha.

The line was completed in May Coast-to-coast passenger travel in 8 days now replaced wagon trains or sea voyages that took 6 to 10 months and cost much more.

The road was built with mortgages from New York, Boston, and London, backed by land grants. There were no federal cash subsidies, But there was a loan to the Central Pacific that was eventually repaid at six percent interest.

The federal government offered land-grants in a checkerboard pattern. The railroad sold every-other square, with the government opening its half to homesteaders.

Local and state governments also aided the financing. Most of the manual laborers on the Central Pacific were new arrivals from China.

He concludes that senior officials quickly realized the high degree of cleanliness and reliability of the Chinese. Ong explores whether or not the Chinese Railroad Workers were exploited by the railroad, with whites in better positions.

He finds the railroad set different wage rates for whites and Chinese and used the latter in the more menial and dangerous jobs, such as the handling and the pouring of nitroglycerin.

Building the railroad required six main activities: surveying the route, blasting a right of way, building tunnels and bridges, clearing and laying the roadbed, laying the ties and rails, and maintaining and supplying the crews with food and tools.

The work was highly physical, using horse-drawn plows and scrapers, and manual picks, axes, sledgehammers, and handcarts.

A few steam-driven machines, such as shovels, were used. For blasting, they used black powder. Six transcontinental railroads were built in the Gilded Age plus two in Canada ; they opened up the West to farmers and ranchers.

All but the Great Northern of James J. Hill relied on land grants. The financial stories were often complex. For example, the Northern Pacific received its major land grant in Financier Jay Cooke — was in charge until when he went bankrupt.

Federal courts, however, kept bankrupt railroads in operation. In Henry Villard — took over and finally completed the line to Seattle.

But the line went bankrupt in the Panic of and Hill took it over. He then merged several lines with financing from J. Morgan , but President Theodore Roosevelt broke them up in In the first year of operation, —70, , passengers made the long trip.

Settlers were encouraged with promotions to come West on free scouting trips to buy railroad land on easy terms spread over several years. The railroads had "Immigration Bureaus" which advertised package low-cost deals including passage and land on easy terms for farmers in Germany and Scandinavia.

The prairies, they were promised, did not mean backbreaking toil because "settling on the prairie which is ready for the plow is different from plunging into a region covered with timber".

All manufacturers benefited from the lower costs of transportation and the much larger radius of business. White concludes with a mixed verdict.

The transcontinentals did open up the West to settlement, brought in many thousands of high-tech, highly paid workers and managers, created thousands of towns and cities, oriented the nation onto an east-west axis, and proved highly valuable for the nation as a whole.

On the other hand, too many were built, and they were built too far ahead of actual demand. The result was a bubble that left heavy losses to investors and led to poor management practices.

By contrast, as White notes, the lines in the Midwest and East supported by a very large population base, fostered farming, industry, and mining while generating steady profits and receiving few government benefits.

After the Civil War , many from the East Coast and Europe were lured west by reports from relatives and by extensive advertising campaigns promising "the Best Prairie Lands", "Low Prices", "Large Discounts For Cash", and "Better Terms Than Ever!

The new railroads provided the opportunity for migrants to go out and take a look, with special family tickets, the cost of which could be applied to land purchases offered by the railroads.

Farming the plains was indeed more difficult than back east. Water management was more critical, lightning fires were more prevalent, the weather was more extreme, rainfall was less predictable.

The fearful stayed home. The actual migrants looked beyond fears of the unknown. Their chief motivation to move west was to find a better economic life than the one they had.

Farmers sought larger, cheaper, and more fertile land; merchants and tradesmen sought new customers and new leadership opportunities.

Laborers wanted higher paying work and better conditions. As settlers move West, they have to face challenges along the way, such as the lack of wood for housing, bad weather like blizzards and droughts, and fearsome tornadoes.

One of the greatest plagues that hit the homesteaders was the Locust Plague which devastated the Great Plains. On April 22, over , settlers and cattlemen known as "boomers" [] lined up at the border, and when the army's guns and bugles giving the signal, began a mad dash to stake their claims in the Land Run of A witness wrote, "The horsemen had the best of it from the start.

It was a fine race for a few minutes, but soon the riders began to spread out like a fan, and by the time they reached the horizon they were scattered about as far as the eye could see".

In the same manner, millions of acres of additional land were opened up and settled in the following four years. Indian wars have occurred throughout the United States though the conflicts are generally separated into two categories; the Indian wars east of the Mississippi River and the Indian wars west of the Mississippi.

Bureau of the Census provided an estimate of deaths:. The Indian wars under the government of the United States have been more than 40 in number.

They have cost the lives of about 19, white men, women and children, including those killed in individual combats, and the lives of about 30, Indians.

The actual number of killed and wounded Indians must be very much higher than the given Fifty percent additional would be a safe estimate Historian Russell Thornton estimates that from to , the Indian population declined from , to as few as , The depopulation was principally caused by disease as well as warfare.

Many tribes in Texas, such as the Karankawan , Akokisa , Bidui and others, were extinguished due to conflicts with settlers. Government, and the Doolittle Committee was formed to investigate the causes as well as provide recommendations for preserving the population.

The expansion of migration into the Southeastern United States in the s to the s forced the federal government to deal with the "Indian question".

The Indians were under federal control but were independent of state governments. State legislatures and state judges had no authority on their lands, and the states demanded control.

Politically the new Democratic Party of President Andrew Jackson demanded the removal of the Indians out of the southeastern states to new lands in the west, while the Whig Party and the Protestant churches were opposed to removal.

The Jacksonian Democracy proved irresistible, as it won the presidential elections of , , and By the "Indian Removal policy" began, to implement the act of Congress signed by Andrew Jackson in Many historians have sharply attacked Jackson.

The forced march of about twenty tribes included the "Five Civilized Tribes" Creek , Choctaw , Cherokee , Chickasaw , and Seminole. To motivate Natives reluctant to move, the federal government also promised rifles, blankets, tobacco, and cash.

By the Cherokee, the last Indian nation in the South, had signed the removal treaty and relocated to Oklahoma. All the tribes were given new land in the " Indian Territory " which later became Oklahoma.

Of the approximate 70, Indians removed, about 18, died from disease, starvation, and exposure on the route.

The impact of the removals was severe. The transplanted tribes had considerable difficulty adapting to their new surroundings and sometimes clashed with the tribes native to the area.

The only way for an Indian to remain and avoid removal was to accept the federal offer of acres 2. However, many Natives who took the offer were defrauded by "ravenous speculators" who stole their claims and sold their land to whites.

Of the five tribes, the Seminole offered the most resistance, hiding out in the Florida swamps and waging a war which cost the U.

Indian warriors in the West, using their traditional style of limited, battle-oriented warfare, confronted the U.

The Indians emphasized bravery in combat while the Army put its emphasis not so much on individual combat as on building networks of forts, developing a logistics system, and using the telegraph and railroads to coordinate and concentrate its forces.

Plains Indian intertribal warfare bore no resemblance to the "modern" warfare practiced by the Americans along European lines, using its vast advantages in population and resources.

Many tribes avoided warfare and others supported the U. The tribes hostile to the government continued to pursue their traditional brand of fighting and, therefore, were unable to have any permanent success against the Army.

Indian wars were fought throughout the western regions, with more conflicts in the states bordering Mexico than in the interior states.

Arizona ranked highest, with known battles fought within the state's boundaries between Americans and the Natives.

Arizona ranked highest in war deaths, with 4, killed, including soldiers, civilians, and Native Americans. That was more than twice as many as occurred in Texas, the second-highest-ranking state.

Most of the deaths in Arizona were caused by the Apache. Michno also says that fifty-one percent of the Indian war battles between and took place in Arizona, Texas, and New Mexico, as well as thirty-seven percent of the casualties in the county west of the Mississippi River.

One of the deadliest Indian wars fought was the Snake War in —, which was conducted by a confederacy of Northern Paiute , Bannock and Shoshone Native Americans, called the "Snake Indians" against the United States Army in the states of Oregon, Nevada, California, and Idaho which ran along the Snake River.

Indians included in this group attacked and harassed emigrant parties and miners crossing the Snake River Valley, which resulted in further retaliation of the white settlements and the intervention of the United States army.

The war resulted in a total of 1, men who have been killed, wounded, and captured from both sides. Unlike other Indian Wars, the Snake War has widely forgotten in United States history due to having only limited coverage of the war.

The Colorado War fought by Cheyenne , Arapaho and Sioux, was fought in the territories of Colorado to Nebraska. The conflict was fought in — while the American Civil War was still ongoing.

Caused by dissolution between the Natives and the white settlers in the region, the war was infamous for the atrocities done between the two parties.

White militias destroyed Native villages and killed Indian women and children such as the bloody Sand Creek massacre , and the Indians also raided ranches, farms and killed white families such as the American Ranch massacre and Raid on Godfrey Ranch.

In the Apache Wars , Colonel Christopher "Kit" Carson forced the Mescalero Apache onto a reservation in In —, Carson used a scorched earth policy in the Navajo Campaign , burning Navajo fields and homes, and capturing or killing their livestock.

He was aided by other Indian tribes with long-standing enmity toward the Navajos, chiefly the Utes. The Apaches under his command conducted ambushes on US cavalries and forts, such as their attack on Cibecue Creek , while also raiding upon prominent farms and ranches, such as their infamous attack on the Empire Ranch that killed three cowboys.

During the Comanche Campaign , the Red River War was fought in —75 in response to the Comanche's dwindling food supply of buffalo, as well as the refusal of a few bands to be inducted in reservations.

The war finally ended with a final confrontation between the Comanches and the U. Cavalry in Palo Duro Canyon.

The last Comanche war chief, Quanah Parker , surrendered in June , which would finally end the wars fought by Texans and Indians.

Red Cloud's War was led by the Lakota chief Red Cloud against the military who were erecting forts along the Bozeman Trail.

It was the most successful campaign against the U. By the Treaty of Fort Laramie , the U. With 53 Modoc warriors, Captain Jack held off 1, men of the U.

Army for 7 months. Captain Jack killed Edward Canby. Numbering only warriors, the Nez Perce "battled some 2, American regulars and volunteers of different military units, together with their Indian auxiliaries of many tribes, in a total of eighteen engagements, including four major battles and at least four fiercely contested skirmishes.

The Great Sioux War of was conducted by the Lakota under Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. The conflict began after repeated violations of the Treaty of Fort Laramie once gold was discovered in the hills.

One of its famous battles was the Battle of the Little Bighorn , in which combined Sioux and Cheyenne forces defeated the 7th Cavalry, led by General George Armstrong Custer.

The end of the major Indian wars came at the Wounded Knee massacre on December 29, , where the 7th Cavalry attempted to disarm a Sioux man and precipitated an engagement in which about Sioux men, women, and children were killed.

Only thirteen days before, Sitting Bull had been killed with his son Crow Foot in a gun battle with a group of Indian police that had been sent by the American government to arrest him.

Army soldiers and Native Americans though occurred in the Battle of Bear Valley on January 9, As the frontier moved westward, the establishment of U.

They served as bases for troops at or near strategic areas, particularly for counteracting the Indian presence.

For example, Fort Bowie protected Apache Pass in southern Arizona along the mail route between Tucson and El Paso and was used to launch attacks against Cochise and Geronimo.

Fort Laramie and Fort Kearny helped protect immigrants crossing the Great Plains and a series of posts in California protected miners. Forts were constructed to launch attacks against the Sioux.

As Indian reservations sprang up, the military set up forts to protect them. Forts also guarded the Union Pacific and other rail lines.

Other important forts were Fort Sill , Oklahoma, Fort Smith , Arkansas, Fort Snelling , Minnesota, Fort Union , New Mexico, Fort Worth , Texas, and Fort Walla Walla in Washington.

Fort Omaha , Nebraska, was home to the Department of the Platte , and was responsible for outfitting most Western posts for more than 20 years after its founding in the late s.

Fort Huachuca in Arizona was also originally a frontier post and is still in use by the United States Army.

Settlers on their way overland to Oregon and California became targets of Indian threats. Robert L. Munkres read 66 diaries of parties traveling the Oregon Trail between and to estimate the actual dangers they faced from Indian attacks in Nebraska and Wyoming.

The vast majority of diarists reported no armed attacks at all. However many did report harassment by Indians who begged or demanded tolls, and stole horses and cattle.

A second treaty secured safe passage along the Santa Fe Trail for wagon trains. In return, the tribes would receive, for ten years, annual compensation for damages caused by migrants.

In the Far West settlers began to occupy land in Oregon and California before the federal government secured title from the native tribes, causing considerable friction.

In Utah, the Mormons also moved in before federal ownership was obtained. A new policy of establishing reservations came gradually into shape after the boundaries of the "Indian Territory" began to be ignored.

In providing for Indian reservations, Congress and the Office of Indian Affairs hoped to de-tribalize Native Americans and prepare them for integration with the rest of American society, the "ultimate incorporation into the great body of our citizen population".

Influential pioneer towns included Omaha , Nebraska City , and St. American attitudes towards Indians during this period ranged from malevolence "the only good Indian is a dead Indian" to misdirected humanitarianism Indians live in "inferior" societies and by assimilation into white society they can be redeemed to somewhat realistic Native Americans and settlers could co-exist in separate but equal societies, dividing up the remaining western land.

Conflicts erupted in the s, resulting in various Indian wars. Such as in the case of Oliver Loving , they would sometimes attack cowboys and their cattle if ever caught crossing in the borders of their land.

However, the relationship between cowboys and Native Americans were more mutual than they are portrayed, and the former would occasionally pay a fine of 10 cents per cow for the latter to allow them to travel through their land.

After the Civil War, as the volunteer armies disbanded, the regular army cavalry regiments increased in number from six to ten, among them Custer's U.

The black units, along with others both cavalry and infantry , collectively became known as the Buffalo Soldiers.

According to Robert M. Utley :. The frontier army was a conventional military force trying to control, by conventional military methods, a people that did not behave like conventional enemies and, indeed, quite often were not enemies at all.

This is the most difficult of all military assignments, whether in Africa, Asia, or the American West. Westerners were proud of their leadership in the movement for democracy and equality, a major theme for Frederick Jackson Turner.

The new states of Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, and Ohio were more democratic than the parent states back East in terms of politics and society.

By the West, especially California and Oregon, led the Progressive movement. Scholars have examined the social history of the west in search of the American character.

The history of Kansas , argued historian Carl L. Becker a century ago, reflects American ideals. He wrote: "The Kansas spirit is the American spirit double distilled.

It is a new grafted product of American individualism, American idealism, American intolerance. Kansas is America in microcosm.

Scholars have compared the emergence of democracy in America with other countries, regarding the frontier experience. The American frontiersmen relied on individual effort, in the context of very large quantities of unsettled land with weak external enemies.

Israel by contrast, operated in a very small geographical zone, surrounded by more powerful neighbors. The Jewish pioneer was not building an individual or family enterprise, but was a conscious participant in nation-building, with a high priority on collective and cooperative planned settlements.

The Israeli pioneers brought in American experts on irrigation and agriculture to provide technical advice. However, they rejected the American frontier model in favor of a European model that supported their political and security concerns.

The cities played an essential role in the development of the frontier, as transportation hubs, financial and communications centers, and providers of merchandise, services, and entertainment.

They then shipped the cattle out and cattle drives became short-distance affairs. However, the passenger trains were often the targets of armed gangs.

Denver's economy before had been rooted in mining; it then grew by expanding its role in railroads, wholesale trade, manufacturing, food processing, and servicing the growing agricultural and ranching hinterland.

Denver had always attracted miners, workers, whores, and travelers. Saloons and gambling dens sprung up overnight. The city fathers boasted of its fine theaters, and especially the Tabor Grand Opera House built in Denver gained regional notoriety with its range of bawdy houses, from the sumptuous quarters of renowned madams to the squalid "cribs" located a few blocks away.

Business was good; visitors spent lavishly, then left town. As long as madams conducted their business discreetly, and "crib girls" did not advertise their availability too crudely, authorities took their bribes and looked the other way.

Occasional cleanups and crack downs satisfied the demands for reform. With its giant mountain of copper, Butte, Montana , was the largest, richest, and rowdiest mining camp on the frontier.

It was an ethnic stronghold, with the Irish Catholics in control of politics and of the best jobs at the leading mining corporation Anaconda Copper.

Ring argues that the library was originally a mechanism of social control, "an antidote to the miners' proclivity for drinking, whoring, and gambling".

It was also designed to promote middle-class values and to convince Easterners that Butte was a cultivated city. European immigrants often built communities of similar religious and ethnic backgrounds.

For example, many Finns went to Minnesota and Michigan, Swedes and Norwegians to Minnesota and the Dakotas, Irish to railroad centers along the transcontinental lines, Volga Germans to North Dakota, and German Jews to Portland, Oregon.

African Americans moved West as soldiers, as well as cowboys, farmhands, saloon workers, cooks, and outlaws. The Buffalo Soldiers were soldiers in the all-black 9th and 10th Cavalry regiments, and 24th and 25th Infantry Regiments of the U.

They had white officers and served in numerous western forts. About 4, blacks came to California in Gold Rush days. In , after the end of Reconstruction in the South, several thousand Freedmen moved from Southern states to Kansas.

Known as the Exodusters , they were lured by the prospect of good, cheap Homestead Law land and better treatment. The all-black town of Nicodemus, Kansas , which was founded in , was an organized settlement that predates the Exodusters but is often associated with them.

The California Gold Rush included thousands of Mexican and Chinese arrivals. Chinese migrants, many of whom were impoverished peasants, provided the major part of the workforce for the building of the Central Pacific portion of the transcontinental railroad.

Most of them went home by when the railroad was finished. The Chinese were generally forced into self-sufficient "Chinatowns" in cities such as San Francisco , Portland , and Seattle.

By the s, however, Chinatowns had become clean, safe and attractive tourist destinations. The first Japanese arrived in the U.

Japanese were recruited to work on plantations in Hawaii, beginning in By the late 19th Century, more Japanese emigrated to Hawaii and the American mainland.

The Issei, or first-generation Japanese immigrants, were not allowed to become U. This did not change until the passage of the Immigration and Nationality Act of , known as the McCarran-Walter Act, which allowed Japanese immigrants to become naturalized U.

There were , Japanese Americans in the U. The great majority of Hispanics who had been living in the former territories of New Spain remained and became American citizens in The 10, or so Californios lived in southern California and after were overshadowed by the hundreds of thousands of arrivals from the east.

Those in New Mexico dominated towns and villages that changed little until well into the 20th century.

New arrivals from Mexico arrived, especially after the Revolution of terrorized thousands of villages all across Mexico.

Most refugees went to Texas or California, and soon poor barrios appeared in many border towns. Early on there was a criminal element as well.

The California "Robin Hood", Joaquin Murieta , led a gang in the s which burned houses, killed miners, and robbed stagecoaches.

In Texas, Juan Cortina led a year campaign against Anglos and the Texas Rangers , starting around On the Great Plains very few single men attempted to operate a farm or ranch; farmers clearly understood the need for a hard-working wife, and numerous children, to handle the many chores, including child-rearing, feeding, and clothing the family, managing the housework, and feeding the hired hands.

After a generation or so, women increasingly left the fields, thus redefining their roles within the family. New conveniences such as sewing and washing machines encouraged women to turn to domestic roles.

The scientific housekeeping movement, promoted across the land by the media and government extension agents, as well as county fairs which featured achievements in home cookery and canning, advice columns for women in the farm papers, and home economics courses in the schools all contributed to this trend.

Although the eastern image of farm life on the prairies emphasizes the isolation of the lonely farmer and farm life, in reality, rural folk created a rich social life for themselves.

They often sponsored activities that combined work, food, and entertainment such as barn raisings , corn huskings, quilting bees, [] Grange meetings , [] church activities, and school functions.

The womenfolk organized shared meals and potluck events, as well as extended visits between families. Childhood on the American frontier is contested territory.

One group of scholars, following the lead of novelists Willa Cather and Laura Ingalls Wilder , argue the rural environment was beneficial to the child's upbringing.

Historians Katherine Harris [] and Elliott West [] write that rural upbringing allowed children to break loose from urban hierarchies of age and gender, promoted family interdependence, and at the end produced children who were more self-reliant, mobile, adaptable, responsible, independent and more in touch with nature than their urban or eastern counterparts.

On the other hand, historians Elizabeth Hampsten [] and Lillian Schlissel [] offer a grim portrait of loneliness, privation, abuse, and demanding physical labor from an early age.

Riney-Kehrberg takes a middle position. Entrepreneurs set up shops and businesses to cater to the miners.

World-famous were the houses of prostitution found in every mining camp worldwide. Chinese women were frequently sold by their families and taken to the camps as prostitutes; they had to send their earnings back to the family in China.

She nursed victims of an influenza epidemic; this gave her acceptance in the community and the support of the sheriff. The townspeople were shocked when she was murdered in ; they gave her a lavish funeral and speedily tried and hanged her assailant.

It was not uncommon for bordellos in Western towns to operate openly, without the stigma of East Coast cities. Gambling and prostitution were central to life in these western towns, and only later — as the female population increased, reformers moved in, and other civilizing influences arrived — did prostitution become less blatant and less common.

Whenever a new settlement or mining camp started one of the first buildings or tents erected would be a gambling hall. As the population grew, gambling halls were typically the largest and most ornately decorated buildings in any town and often housed a bar, stage for entertainment, and hotel rooms for guests.

These establishments were a driving force behind the local economy and many towns measured their prosperity by the number of gambling halls and professional gamblers they had.

Towns that were friendly to gambling were typically known to sports as "wide-awake" or "wide-open". The cowboys had been accumulating their wages and postponing their pleasures until they finally arrived in town with money to wager.

Abilene , Dodge City , Wichita , Omaha , and Kansas City all had an atmosphere that was convivial to gaming.

Such an atmosphere also invited trouble and such towns also developed reputations as lawless and dangerous places. Historian Waddy W. Moore uses court records to show that on the sparsely settled Arkansas frontier lawlessness was common.

He distinguished two types of crimes: unprofessional dueling , crimes of drunkenness, selling whiskey to the Indians, cutting trees on federal land and professional rustling , highway robbery , counterfeiting.

Bandits, typically in groups of two or three, rarely attacked stagecoaches with a guard carrying a sawed-off, double-barreled shotgun; it proved less risky to rob teamsters, people on foot, and solitary horsemen, [] while bank robberies themselves were harder to pull off due to the security of the establishment.

When criminals were convicted, the punishment was severe. Law enforcement emphasized maintaining stability more than armed combat, focusing on drunkenness, disarming cowboys who violated gun-control edicts and dealing with flagrant breaches of gambling and prostitution ordinances.

Dykstra argues that the violent image of the cattle towns in film and fiction is largely a myth. The real Dodge City, he says, was the headquarters for the buffalo-hide trade of the Southern Plains and one of the West's principal cattle towns, a sale and shipping point for cattle arriving from Texas.

He states there is a "second Dodge City" that belongs to the popular imagination and thrives as a cultural metaphor for violence, chaos, and depravity.

A contemporary eyewitness of Hays City, Kansas, paints a vivid image of this cattle town:. Hays City by lamplight was remarkably lively, but not very moral.

Conrad performed nearly all of his own stunts in the series. Things started moving quicker when I took the jumps and the spills. We started meeting the budget.

On January 24, , however, during filming of "The Night of the Fugitives" near the end of the third season, Conrad fell from a chandelier onto the stage floor and suffered a concussion.

I was in intensive care for 72 hours, with a six-inch lineal fracture of the skull and a high temporal concussion.

Conrad spent weeks in the hospital and had a long convalescence slowed by constant dizziness. The episode was eventually completed and aired early during the fourth season, with footage of the fall left in.

Conrad later told Percy Shain of the Boston Globe , "I have the whole scene on film. It's a constant reminder to be careful.

It also bolstered my determination to make this my last year with the series. Four seasons are enough of this sort of thing.

Prior to The Wild Wild West, Ross Martin co-starred in the CBS series Mr. Lucky from to , portraying Mr. Lucky's sidekick, Andamo.

The series was created by Blake Edwards , who also cast Martin in his films Experiment in Terror and The Great Race Martin once called his role as Artemus Gordon "a show-off's showcase" because it allowed him to portray over different characters during the course of the series, and perform dozens of different dialects.

Martin sketched his ideas for his characterizations and worked with the makeup artists to execute the final look. Martin told Percy Shain of the Boston Globe , "In the three years of the show, I have run a wider gamut than even those acknowledged masters of disguise, Paul Muni and Lon Chaney.

Sometimes I feel like a one man repertory company. I think I've proven to myself and to the industry that I am the No. Martin broke his leg in a fourth-season episode, "The Night of the Avaricious Actuary," when he dropped a rifle, stepped on it, and his foot rolled over it.

Martin told Percy Shain of the Boston Globe, "In the scene where I was hurt, my stand-in tried to finish it. When the shell ejected from the rifle, it caught him in the eye and burned it.

We still haven't finished that scene. It will have to wait until I can move around again. A few weeks later, after completing "The Night of Fire and Brimstone", Martin suffered a heart attack on August 17, This was exactly two years after the show's creator, Michael Garrison, died.

Martin's character was replaced temporarily by other agents played by Charles Aidman four episodes , Alan Hale, Jr.

Aidman said the producers had promised to rewrite the scripts for his new character, but this simply amounted to scratching out the name "Artemus Gordon" and penciling in "Jeremy Pike" his character's name.

Martin returned to work in mid-December and appeared in the final three episodes to be filmed. The show's most memorable recurring arch- villain was Dr.

Miguelito Quixote Loveless , a brilliant but petulant and megalomaniacal dwarf portrayed by Michael Dunn. Initially he had two companions: the huge Voltaire, played by Richard Kiel ; and the beautiful Antoinette, played by Dunn's real-life singing partner, Phoebe Dorin.

Voltaire disappeared without explanation after his third episode Richard Kiel returned in a different role in "The Night of the Simian Terror" , and Antoinette after her sixth.

According to the television film The Wild Wild West Revisited , Loveless eventually dies in from ulcers , brought on by the frustration of having his plans consistently foiled by West and Gordon his son, played by Paul Williams in the TV film, subsequently seeks revenge on the agents.

Though several actors appeared in different villainous roles, only one other character had a second encounter with West and Gordon: Count Manzeppi, played flamboyantly by Victor Buono Buono played a different villain in the pilot episode.

Manzeppi was a diabolical genius of "black magic" and crime, who—like Dr. Loveless—had an escape plan at the end. Buono also returned in More Wild Wild West as "Dr.

Henry Messenger", a parody of Henry Kissinger. Agnes Moorehead won an Emmy for her role as Emma Valentine in "The Night of The Vicious Valentine".

Other villains were portrayed by Leslie Nielsen , Sam Wanamaker , Martin Landau , Burgess Meredith , Boris Karloff , Ida Lupino , Carroll O'Connor , Ricardo Montalban , Robert Duvall , Ed Asner , and Harvey Korman.

While the show's writers created their fair share of villains, they often started with the nefarious, stylized and sometimes anachronistic inventions of these madmen or madwomen , and then wrote the episodes around these devices.

Henry Sharp, the series' story consultant, would sketch the preliminaries of the designs eccentrically numbering every sketch "fig.

CBS also approached Fleming about developing a Bond TV series. Fleming later contributed ideas to NBC's The Man From U. In Ratoff and Michael Garrison formed a production company to make a "Casino Royale" film, with Ratoff set to direct and 20th Century Fox set to distribute.

Production stalled when Ratoff and Garrison could not obtain financing. In , Hedda Hopper reported that Ratoff's film would star Peter Finch as Bond.

Feldman and director Howard Hawks were interested in making "Casino Royale" with Cary Grant as Bond. By then, Garrison and CBS had brought James Bond to television in a unique way.

The series' pilot episode, "The Night of the Inferno", was filmed in December Western novelist and screenwriter Clair Huffaker also worked on the concept.

It was his idea, for example, to have a secret agent named Jim West who would perform secret missions for President Ulysses S.

Ralston later sued Warner Bros. As indicated by Robert Conrad on his DVD commentary, the show went through several producers in its first season.

This was apparently due to conflicts between the network and Garrison, who had no experience producing for television and had trouble staying on budget.

At first, Ben Brady was named producer, but he was shifted to Rawhide , which had its own crisis when star Eric Fleming quit at the end of the season.

Rawhide lasted another thirteen episodes before it was cancelled by CBS. The network then hired Collier Young. Young also claimed to have added the wry second "Wild" to the series title, which had been simply "The Wild West" in its early stages of production.

Conrad was not sorry to see Young go: "I don't mind. All that guy did creatively was put the second 'wild' in the title.

CBS did the right thing. Young's replacement, Fred Freiberger , returned the series to its original concept. It was on his watch that writer John Kneubuhl , inspired by a magazine article about Michael Dunn , created the arch-villain Dr.

Miguelito Loveless. Phoebe Dorin, who played Loveless' assistant, Antoinette, recalled: "Michael Garrison came to see [our] nightclub act when he was in New York.

Garrison said to himself, 'Michael Dunn would make the most extraordinary villain. People have never seen anything like him before, and he's a fabulous little actor and he's funny as hell.

He came backstage and he told us who he was and he said he was going to do a television show called The Wild Wild West and we would be called. We thought, 'Yeah, yeah, we've heard all that before.

And that's how it started, because he saw the nightclub act. The character became an immediate hit and Dunn was contracted to appear in four episodes per season.

Because of health problems, however, Dunn only appeared in 10 episodes instead of After ten episodes 5—14 , Freiberger and executive producer Michael Garrison were, according to Variety, "unceremoniously dumped," reputedly due to a behind-the-scenes power struggle.

Garrison was replaced by Phillip Leacock, the executive producer of Gunsmoke , and Freiberger was supplanted by John Mantley, an associate producer on Gunsmoke.

The exchange stunned both cast and crew. He turned the matter over to his attorneys. Freiberger said, "I was fired for accomplishing what I had been hired to do.

I was hired to pull the show together when it was in chaos. Let's face it, the show is healthy. I think Fred Freiberger is totally correct in his concept of the show.

It's an administrative change, for what reason I don't know. Mantley produced seven 15—21 episodes then returned to his former position on Gunsmoke , and Gene L.

Coon took over as associate producer. By then, Garrison's conflict with CBS was resolved and he returned to the executive producer role.

Coon left after six episodes 22—27 to write First to Fight , a Warner Bros. Garrison produced the last episode of season one and the initial episodes of season two.

Garrison's return was much to the relief of Ross Martin, who once revealed that he was so disenchanted during the first season that he tried to quit three times.

He explained that Garrison "saw the show as a Bond spoof laid in , and we all knew where we stood. Each new producer tried to put his stamp on the show and I had a terrible struggle.

I fought them line by line in every script. They knew they couldn't change the James West role very much, but it was open season on Artemus Gordon because they had never seen anything like him before.

On August 17, , however, during production of the new season's ninth episode, "The Night of the Ready-Made Corpse", Garrison fell down a flight of stairs in his home, fractured his skull, and died.

CBS assigned Bruce Lansbury , brother of actress Angela Lansbury , to produce the show for the remainder of its run. In the early s Lansbury had been in charge of daytime shows at CBS Television City in Hollywood, then vice president of programming in New York.

When he was tapped for The Wild Wild West, Lansbury was working with his twin brother, Edgar , producing legitimate theater on Broadway. The first season's episodes were filmed in black and white, and they were darker in tone.

Cinematographer Ted Voightlander was nominated for an Emmy Award for his work on one of these episodes, "The Night of the Howling Light. The Wild Wild West was filmed at CBS Studio Center on Radford Avenue in Studio City in the San Fernando Valley.

The acre lot was formerly the home of Republic Studios , which specialized in low-budget films including Westerns starring Roy Rogers and Gene Autry and Saturday morning serials which The Wild Wild West appropriately echoed.

CBS had a wall-to-wall lease on the lot starting in May , and produced Gunsmoke and Rawhide there, as well as Gilligan's Island.

Beginning in , MTM Enterprises headed by actress Mary Tyler Moore and her then-husband, Grant Tinker became the Studio Center's primary tenant.

In the mids the western streets and sets were replaced with new sound stages and urban facades, including the New York streets seen in Seinfeld.

In the lagoon set that was originally constructed for Gilligan's Island was paved over to create a parking lot. Among iconic locations used for filming were Bronson Canyon "Night of the Returning Dead" S02E05 and Vasquez Rocks "Night of the Cadre" S02E For the pilot episode, "The Night of the Inferno", the producers used Sierra Railroad No.

Footage of this train, with a 5 replacing the 3 on its number plate, was shot in Jamestown, California. Best known for its role as the Hooterville Cannonball in the CBS series Petticoat Junction , Sierra No.

It was built by the Rogers Locomotive and Machine Works in Paterson, New Jersey. When The Wild Wild West went into series production, however, an entirely different train was employed.

The locomotive, a named the Inyo, was built in by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia. The Inyo, as well as the express car and the passenger car, originally served the Virginia and Truckee Railroad in Nevada.

The Inyo appears in numerous films including High, Wide, and Handsome , Union Pacific , The Marx Brothers ' Go West , Meet Me in St.

Louis , , Red River , Disney 's The Great Locomotive Chase and McLintock! For The Wild Wild West , Inyo's original number plate was temporarily changed from No.

Footage of the Inyo in motion and idling was shot around Menifee, California , and reused in virtually every episode stock footage of Sierra No.

These trains were used only for exterior shots. The luxurious interior of the passenger car was constructed on Stage 6 at CBS Studio Center. The train interior was also used in at least one episode of Gunsmoke "Death Train," aired January 27, , and in at least two episodes of The Big Valley "Last Train to the Fair," aired April 27, , and "Days of Wrath," aired January 8, All three series were filmed at CBS Studio Center and shared other exterior and interior sets.

Additionally, the train interior was used for an episode of Get Smart "The King Lives? After her run on The Wild Wild West , the Inyo participated in the Golden Spike Centennial at Promontory, Utah, in The following year it appeared as a replica of the Central Pacific's "Jupiter" locomotive at the Golden Spike National Historical Site.

The State of Nevada purchased the Inyo in ; it was restored to vintage, including a wider smoke stack and a new pilot cow catcher without a drop coupler.

The Inyo is still operational and displayed at the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Carson City. The express car No. Built in at the Mason Machine Works in Taunton, Massachusetts , it was later renamed The William Mason in honor of its manufacturer.

For its role as "The Wanderer" in the film, the engine was sent to the steam shops at the Strasburg Rail Road for restoration and repainting.

Both the Inyo and The William Mason appeared in the Disney film The Great Locomotive Chase The Wild Wild West featured numerous, often anachronistic, gadgets.

Some were recurring devices, such as West's sleeve gun or a breakaway derringer hidden in his left and right boot heels.

Others appeared in only a single episode. The main title theme was written by Richard Markowitz , who previously composed the theme for the TV series The Rebel.

He was brought in after the producers rejected two attempts by film composer Dimitri Tiomkin. In an interview by Susan Kesler for her book, The Wild Wild West: The Series included in the first season DVD boxed set, Markowitz recalled that the original Tiomkin theme "was very, kind of, traditional, it just seemed wrong.

That took it away from the serious kind of thing that Tiomkin was trying to do What I did essentially was write two themes: the rhythmic, contemporary theme, Fender bass and brushes, that vamp, for the cartoon effects and for West's getting himself out of trouble, and the heraldic western outdoor theme over that, so that the two worked together.

Session musicians who played on the theme were Tommy Morgan harmonica ; Bud Shank , Ronnie Lang , Plas Johnson , and Gene Cipriano woodwinds ; Vince DeRosa and Henry Sigismonti French Horns ; Uan Rasey , Ollie Mitchell , and Tony Terran trumpets ; Dick Nash , Lloyd Ulyate, Chauncey Welsch, Kenny Shroyer trombones.

Tommy Tedesco and Bill Pitman guitars ; Carol Kaye Fender bass ; Joe Porcaro brushes ; Gene Estes, Larry Bunker , and Emil Richards timpani, percussion.

Markowitz, however, was never credited for his theme in any episode; it is believed [ by whom? Markowitz did receive "music composed and conducted by" credits for episodes he'd scored such as "The Night of the Bars of Hell" and "The Night of the Raven" or where he supplied the majority of tracked-in cues for example in "The Night of the Grand Emir" and "The Night of the Gypsy Peril".

He finally received "theme by" credit on both of the TV movies, which were scored by Jeff Alexander rather than Markowitz few personnel from the series were involved with the TV movies.

The animated title sequence was another unique element of the series. Created by Michael Garrison Productions and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, it was directed by Isadore "Friz" Freleng and animated by Ken Mundie, [40] who designed the titles for the film The Great Race and the TV series Secret Agent , Rawhide , and Death Valley Days.

The screen was divided into four corner panels abutting a narrow central panel that contained a cartoon "hero". In the three seasons shot in color, the overall backdrop was an abstracted wash of the flag of the United States , with the upper left panel colored blue and the others containing horizontal red stripes.

This teaser part of the show was incorporated into The History Channel 's Wild West Tech —5. Each episode had four acts. At the end of each act, the scene, usually a cliffhanger moment, would freeze, and a sketch or photograph of the scene faded in to replace the cartoon art in one of the four corner panels.

The style of freeze-frame art changed over the course of the series. In all first-season episodes other than the pilot, the panels were live-action stills made to evoke 19th-century engravings.

In season two the first in color the scenes dissolved to tinted stills; from "The Night of the Flying Pie Plate" on, however, the panels were home to Warhol -like serigraphs of the freeze-frames.

The end credits were displayed over each episode's unique mosaic of scenes. In the final season, however, a generic design was used under the end credits.

Curiously, in this design, the bank robber is unconscious, the cardsharp has no card and the lady is on the ground, but the sixshooter in the upper left-hand panel has returned.

The freeze-frame graphics were shot at a facility called Format Animation. During the first season, the series title "The Wild Wild West" was set in the font Barnum, [41] which resembles the newer font P.

In subsequent seasons, the title appeared in a hand-drawn version of the font Dolphin which resembles newer fonts called Zebrawood, Circus, and Rodeo Clown.

Robert Conrad's name was also set in this font. Ross Martin's name was set in the font Bracelet which resembles newer fonts named Tuscan Ornate and Romantiques.

All episode titles, writer and director credits, guest cast and crew credits were set in Barnum. During commercial breaks, the title "The Wild Wild West" also appeared in Barnum.

The series is generally set during the presidency of Ulysses S. Grant from —77; occasional episodes indicate a more precise date:.

Some episodes were considered violent for their time and that, rather than low ratings ultimately was the series' downfall.

In addition to gunplay, there were usually two fight sequences per episode. These were choreographed by Whitey Hughes and Conrad, and performed by Conrad and a stock company of stuntmen , including Red West , Dick Cangey and Bob Herron who doubled for Ross Martin.

After Conrad suffered a concussion falling from a chandelier in "The Night of the Fugitives," the network insisted that he defer to a stunt double.

His chair on the set was newly inscribed: "Robert Conrad, ex-stuntman, retired by CBS, Jan. Often, George would start a stunt, such as a high fall or a dive through a window, then land behind boxes or off camera where Conrad was hidden and waiting to seamlessly complete the action.

This common stunt technique, known by filmmakers as "The Texas Switch", [43] was often used by Ross Martin and his double, Bob Herron. It was hazardous work.

Hughes recalled, "We had a lot of crashes. We used to say, 'Roll the cameras and call the ambulances! Robert Conrad: 6-inch fracture of the skull, high temporal concussion, partial paralysis.

Ross Martin: broken leg. A broken skull for Red West. Broken leg for Jimmy George. Broken arm for Jack Skelly. And Michael Dunn: head injury and a spinal sprain.

He did his own stunts. And on and on. As a result of the April assassination of Martin Luther King and the June assassination of Robert F.

Kennedy , President Johnson created the National Commission on the Causes and Prevention of Violence.

One of the questions it tackled was if violence on television, including graphic news coverage of the Vietnam War, was a contributing factor to violence in American society.

The television networks, anticipating these allegations, moved to curtail violence on their entertainment programs before the September start of the television season.

However, despite a CBS mandate to tone down the mayhem, "The Night of the Egyptian Queen" aired November 15, contains perhaps the series' most ferocious barroom brawl.

A later memo attached to the shooting script of "The Night of Miguelito's Revenge" aired December 13, reads: "Note to Directors: The producer respectfully asks that no violent acts be shot which are not depicted in the script or discussed beforehand.

Most particularly stay away from gratuitous ad-libs, such as slaps, pointing of firearms or other weapons at characters especially in close quarters , kicks and the use of furniture and other objects in fight scenes.

James West rarely wears a gun in these episodes, and rather than the usual fisticuffs, fight sequences involved tossing, tackling or body blocking the villains.

In December , executives from ABC, CBS and NBC appeared before the President's Commission. The most caustic of the commissioners, Rep.

Hale Boggs D-Louisiana , decried what he called "the Saturday morning theme of children's cartoon shows" that permit "the good guy to do anything in the name of justice.

Three months later, in March , Sen. John O. Pastore D-Rhode Island called the same network presidents before his Senate communications subcommittee for a public scolding on the same subject.

Congress's concern was shared by the public: in a nationwide poll, Additionally, the National Association for Better Broadcasting NABB , in a report eventually issued in November , rated The Wild Wild West "as one of the most violent series on television.

After being excoriated by the two committees, networks scrambled to expunge violence from their programming.

The Wild Wild West received its cancellation notice in mid-February, even before Pastore's committee convened. CBS killed 'The Wild, Wild West' despite high ratings because of criticism.

It was seen by the network as a gesture of good intentions. Conrad denounced Pastore for many years but in other interviews he admitted that it probably was time to cancel the series because he felt that he and the stunt men were pushing their luck.

He also believed the role had hurt his craft. I jumped off roofs and spent all my time with the stuntmen instead of other actors.

On Greyhounds Betting return, Pike sighted the peak in Colorado named after him. Retrieved August 30, Created by Michael Garrison Productions and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, it was directed Binder Deutsch Isadore "Friz" Freleng and animated by Ken Mundie, [40] who Betus Live Chat the titles for the film The Great Race and the TV series Secret AgentRawhideand Death Valley Days. Untergenres des Wildwestfilms, die nicht immer im Wortsinn mit dem Wilden Westen zusammenhängen, sind: der Kavalleriewestern (z. B. Bis zum letzten Mann. Wilder Westen ist eine – geographisch und historisch grob eingegrenzte – umgangssprachliche Bezeichnung für die ungefähr westlich des Mississippi gelegenen Gebiete der heutigen Vereinigten Staaten. In der auch als „Pionierzeit“ bezeichneten Ära. Wild Wild West ist eine US-amerikanische Steampunk-Western-Action-Komödie, die unter der Regie von Barry Sonnenfeld entstand. Der Film startete am. Goldrausch, Cowboys und staubige Stiefel – messen Sie sich mit Ihrem Team in spannenden Western-Challenges. Pow Wow Indianerin. Schon bald kommen sie dem Drahtzieher der Entführungen auf die Schliche: Dr. Salt Salt Mobile hat sich zu einem der wichtigsten…. The most dramatic conflict was the Sioux war in Minnesota in when Dakota tribes systematically attacked German farms Double Top Darts drive out the settlers. The 10, or Wild West Californios lived in southern California and after were overshadowed by the hundreds of thousands of Myp2p Eu from the east. InCongress enacted two major laws to facilitate settlement of the West: the Homestead Act and the Pacific Railroad Act. Some episodes were considered violent for their time and that, rather than Wild West ratings ultimately was the Hot Wheels.De Spiele downfall. The Chinese were generally forced into self-sufficient "Chinatowns" in cities such as San FranciscoPortlandand Seattle. The Indian wars under the government of the United States have been more than 40 in number. Michael Garrison. The eastern half of the route was also used by travelers on the California Trail fromMormon Trail fromand Bozeman Trail from before they turned off to their separate destinations. As long as madams conducted their business discreetly, and "crib girls" did not advertise their availability too crudely, authorities took their bribes and looked the other way. Unlike the North, where small towns and Mafia Games cities were common, the South was overwhelmingly rural. The main food supply at first came from hunting deer, Evowars, and other abundant game. By then, Garrison and CBS had brought James Bond to television in a unique way.  · Bardzo dziki Zachód () Wild Wild West - Dwaj zaufani agenci prezydenta Granta usiłują pokrzyżować plany szalonego konstruktora machin bojowych, doktora themerrythoughts.coms: 75K.  · Wild West Online to gra MMO przeznaczona na platformę PC. Tytuł został wyprodukowany przez nowe studio Games, w którym zatrudnienie znaleźli doświadczeni deweloperzy, pracujący. Premiera Wild West Online jest zaplanowana na grudzień roku. Wcześniej deweloperzy planują przeprowadzić zamknięte testy alpha, a następnie zakrojone na szerszą skalę testy beta. Na ten moment docelową platformą Wild West Online jest Windows, chociaż producenci ze świeżo upieczonego Games rozważają również premierę na. Wild West is a place where the bravest players can compete in the fast-paced farm games! Join the hay day of the Neighborhood Race and prove your farming family is the best in the west. Directed by Barry Sonnenfeld. With Will Smith, Kevin Kline, Kenneth Branagh, Salma Hayek. The two best special agents in the Wild West must save President Grant from the clutches of a diabolical, wheelchair-bound, steampunk-savvy, Confederate scientist bent on revenge for losing the Civil War. Set in the golden days in the American Frontier, The Wild West is an action-packed, outlaw infested Western RPG where anything can happen! Wreak havoc as a merciless outlaw by robbing the bank, stealing valuables off the bronze city train, or kill innocent civilians for their hard-earned loot!. The image of a Wild West filled with countless gunfights was a myth based on repeated exaggerations. The most notable and well-known took place in Arizona, New Mexico, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Actual gunfights in the Old West were more episodic than being a common thing, but when gunfights did occur, the cause for each varied. Wild West Cedar Park. Buy Tickets. More Info March Mar 12 Triston Marez Show | 9pm // Doors | 7pm $10 Wild West Cedar Park. Buy Tickets. More Info.
Wild West
Wild West
Wild West

: Colleg Wild West (Doege) Friedrich, geht FuГџball Tippen in den Wild West des Anbieters. - Inhaltsverzeichnis

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Wild West

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Fekora · 23.10.2020 um 06:11

Ich entschuldige mich, aber meiner Meinung nach lassen Sie den Fehler zu. Schreiben Sie mir in PM, wir werden reden.

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